Uncooperative Radio 07-25-18 Live!

@ 10:00pm ET topics:
We will start the show with a liberty quote. Then, regulations suck, the Second Amendment report, some tech news, and the Illegal Alien report.

Uncooperative Radio 05-25-18 Live!

@ 10:00pm ET topics:

We start the show with The Pledge of Allegiance.
Then, Ups and Downs for the week, this day in history, some technology news, we will visit the wonderful world of animals, again and it’s the economy stupid

The Student Data-Mining Scandal Under Our Noses

From The Daily Signal:

While congresscritters expressed outrage at Facebook’s intrusive data grabs during Capitol Hill hearings with Mark Zuckerberg this week, not a peep was heard about the Silicon Valley-Beltway theft ring purloining the personal information and browsing habits of millions of American schoolchildren.

It doesn’t take undercover investigative journalists to unmask the massive privacy invasion enabled by educational technology and federal mandates. The kiddie data heist is happening out in the open—with Washington politicians and bureaucrats as brazen co-conspirators.

Facebook is just one of the tech giants partnering with the Department of Education and schools nationwide in pursuit of student data for meddling and profit. Google, Apple, Microsoft, Pearson, Knewton, and many more are cashing in on the Big Data boondoggle.

State and federal educational databases provide countless opportunities for private companies exploiting public schoolchildren subjected to annual assessments, which exploded after adoption of the tech industry-supported Common Core “standards,” tests, and aligned texts and curricula.

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The recently passed Every Student Succeeds Act further enshrined government collection of personally identifiable information—including data collected on attitudes, values, beliefs, and dispositions—and allows release of the data to third-party contractors thanks to Obama-era loopholes carved into the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act.

And the so-called school-to-work pipeline creates endless avenues into taxpayer coffers for firms pitching data-gathering initiatives to “align” student learning with “skill sets” and “competencies” desired by corporations.

Facebook, for example, joined with the Department of Education’s federally sponsored Digital Promise initiative last fall to develop a system of “micro-credentialing” badges for adult students in digital marketing. You can be sure it’s not merely out of benevolence and public interest that Zuckerberg’s empire is training thousands of these students to learn “Social Media Marketing Basics,” “Marketing with Facebook Pages,” “Marketing with Facebook Ads,” and “Marketing with Instagram.”

As parent and educational privacy advocate Cheri Kiesecker reported, the Facebook/Digital Promise partnership is “a wonderful data collection and marketing tool for Facebook and the US Department of Ed, but it is incredibly alarming for students’ privacy and security.”

Facebook is on the march from luring adult students into its orbit to encroaching on secondary and elementary school-age users through its Messenger Kids app and “whole-child personalized learning” programs funded through the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

CZI, a “philanthropic investment company” funded with up to $1 billion in Facebook shares over the next three years, is headed by Jim Shelton. He’s a former program officer at the Gates Foundation and a key Common Core champion in the Obama administration.

“Personalized learning” is an edutech buzz phrase for hijacking the classroom and hooking students and teachers on branded software and hardware—iPads, SMART Boards, computerized portfolios, homework apps, you name it—without any evidence that such shiny objects improve academic performance.

Under the guise of customizable assessments, public and private preschools in Colorado experimented with toddlers whose student activities and social/emotional behaviors were tracked using the TS Gold (Teaching Strategies Gold) system—funded with $30 million in Race to the Top subsidies under the Obama administration.

As I reported in 2014, parent Lauren Coker discovered that TS Gold assessors in her son’s Aurora, Colorado, public preschool had recorded information about his trips to the bathroom, his hand-washing habits, and his ability to pull up his pants.

Sunny Flynn, a mom with kids in Jefferson County, Colorado, asked all the right questions: “What security measures are being used to protect this data? Who exactly has access to this data? How long will the data be stored? What is the proven benefit of a kindergarten teacher putting all of this data into a database?”

With little public oversight, Google has infiltrated schools through its “free” Google Apps for Education suite. As I’ve reported previously, Google is building brand loyalty through its questionable certification program that essentially turns teachers into tax-subsidized lobbyists for the company. GAFE enrollees are “trained” on Google products, earn certification, and then open up consultancy businesses and bill their school districts (i.e., the public) to hawk Google’s suite of products to other colleagues.

And this week, 23 parent and watchdog groups filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission alleging that Google is violating child protection laws by collecting personal data of and advertising to those aged under 13.

Over the past four years, Google has admitted “scanning and indexing” student email messages sent using GAFE and data mining student users for commercial gain when they use their accounts for noneducational purposes. Google can collect student/family data to target ads through related services outside the GAFE suite, such as YouTube for Schools, Blogger and Google Plus. These are not covered under the already watered-down federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

Under the Obama years, Grand Canyon-sized loopholes in federal student and family privacy protections opened data mining to third-party private entities. Those have yet to be closed by the Trump administration. Why not? It’s time to drain the student data-mining swamp and their facilitators in Washington. For the children.

Show Notes 01-25-2015

Sunday show 01-25-15

Horrid result when teacher confiscates cell phone
A high-school freshman in New Jersey is now facing a criminal charge after pouncing on his 62-year-old teacher who confiscated the student’s cell phone during class.
Read More

John McCain faces jeers-boos at GOP meeting
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., struggled to get his speech started Saturday at the Arizona Republican Party annual meeting. The chorus of boos and jeers was just too loud.
Read More

Getting married? Hire a bridesmaid for only $2000
It is time for the professionals to take over the bridesmaid game. That’s right: If you are planning a wedding this year, you can hire the services of a professional bridesmaid for only $2,000.
Read More

Obama discusses bias to preschoolers
Discussing a children’s book about discrimination, President Obama told a group of preschoolers Thursday that his job would be a lot easier if some Americans didn’t feel superior to others.
Read More 

Father of chemistry worked to evangelize America
The “Father of Chemistry” wanted to evangelize America? And warned of the end?
Robert Boyle was born Jan. 25, 1627. He studied Bacon, Descartes and other of his contemporaries, including scientists Isaac Newton and Galileo, philosophers John Locke and Thomas Hobbes and poet John Milton.
Read More

Baptists in jail inspire Constitutional revision
James Madison’s defense of religious freedom began when he stood with his father outside a jail in the village of Orange and heard Baptists preach from their cell windows.
Read More

June 30 will be a second longer than any other day this year
A “leap second” needs to be added in 2015 to make sure the time on atomic clocks stays in sync with Earth’s rotational time, but some Internet companies are dreading the day.
Read More

220-Year-Old Time Capsule Buried by Sam Adams & Paul Revere Opened
In 1795, then-Massachusetts Gov. Samuel Adams, famed patriot Paul Revere and Col. William Scollay buried a time capsule under the Massachusetts State House cornerstone in Boston, and now, after more than 200 years, its contents have been revealed.
Read More

Digital life hack: Turn your old phone into a security camera
In these days of nonstop hacking, phishing and data breaches, it’s easy to forget that regular old burglars are still lurking around to steal from your home. That’s why I’m a big fan of home security systems, especially ones that let you watch your home from a distance and alert you when someone breaks in.
Read More

Drivers trying to calculate whether it’s practical to own an electric car are facing a new math.
U.S. gas prices have fallen more than $1 per gallon over the last 12 months, to a national average of $2.06, according to AAA. That makes electric cars — with their higher prices tags — a tougher sell.
Read More

Dinosaurs not wiped out by global firestorm
The theory that a global firestorm accompanied the asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs may not be correct, according to a new study. A team of researchers has found that heat near the impact site would not have been sufficient to ignite plants. It suggests our understanding of the mass extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs may not be as complete as thought.
Read More

Greece anti-bailout Syriza party wins election
The anti-bailout Syriza party won a clear victory in austerity-weary Greece’s national election on Sunday, according to projections by state-run TV’s exit poll.
Read More

Show Notes 07/03/2014

Thursday Show 7/3/14

9 things you may not know about the Declaration of Independence
1. The Declaration of Independence wasn’t signed on July 4, 1776.
On July 1, 1776, the Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia, and on the following day 12 of the 13 colonies voted in favor of Richard Henry Lee’s motion for independence.

NM ranching family tells feds: ‘Don’t fence us out’
For more than a century, the Lucero family has grazed livestock in the majestic landscape near Fenton Lake in the Santa Fe National Forest. They started with sheep and, in the 1920s, switched to cattle.

Josh Earnest has immigration slip
With a slip of the tongue in his July 3 news conference, White House press secretary Josh Earnest stumbled, saying President Barack Obama plans to use the Fourth of July to naturalize “illegal” immigrants.

NY Times Jackie Calmes cheers Democratic quest to hold Senate through single women
Jackie Calmes, New York Times reporter (and reliable water-carrier for Democrats), made Thursday’s front page with a story on the competitive Senate race in North Carolina, a seat the Democrats desperately need to keep in order to maintain their hold on the U.S. Senate.

CBS has no time for latest Obamacare scandal, hypes Malia’s birthday instead
On Thursday, all three broadcast news networks continued to ignore the latest outrage over ObamaCare and the Veterans Affairs scandal. Instead, CBS This Morning chose to file a 3 minute and 26 seconds report on what Malia Obama’s plans were for her 16th birthday on Friday.

NRA changes stance on guns for abusers
Last week, the Governor of Vermont signed a law allowing police to confiscate guns from anyone under a judicial order for domestic abuse. This means that men and women accused of domestic crimes in Vermont could lose their Second Amendment rights before ever seeing a jury.

Open carry celebration set for July 4th
For the second year, members and supporters of Open Carry Tyler are taking to the streets of downtown for Independence Day to practice their Second Amendment rights.

How Disco Clams Put on Undersea Light Shows
Tiny “disco clams” create rippling light shows on the ocean floor, thanks to reflective mirrors that coat their lips, new research shows. Scientists previously believed the 2-inch (5 centimeters) clams (Ctenoides ales) were bioluminescent. But new high-speed video reveals that the clams’ lips are actually covered with tiny silica spheres that reflect natural light.

Pelty Is a “Magic” Bluetooth Speaker Powered by the Element of Fire
Scientists studying the effects of the psychedelic chemical in magic mushrooms have found the human brain displays a similar pattern of activity during dreams as it does during a mind-expanding drug trip.