Show Notes 01-13-2018

Saturday Show 01-13-17 

Cliven Bundy case: How big a problem is prosecutorial misconduct?
Cliven Bundy wanted to walk out of the courtroom in his jail jumpsuit and ankle shackles. Deputy marshals blocked him from doing that. But if it hadn’t been for “flagrant misconduct” committed by federal prosecutors and investigators in the case, the Nevada cattleman may not have been walking out at all.
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‘Pro-America’ Black Rifle Coffee becoming popular among conservatives, founder says
Black Rifle Coffee Company is not where you go to get your average cup of Joe. The Salt Lake City-based venture is making waves with high-quality coffee while taking a pro-Trump, pro-gun and pro-military stance.
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Florida races to accommodate influx of Puerto Rican migrants
At Leslie Campbell’s office in the central Florida city of St. Cloud, the phone will not stop ringing. Director of special programs for the Osceola County School District, Ms. Campbell helps enroll students fleeing storm-ravaged Puerto Rico.
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‘Stable genius’ is a merch windfall’
According to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, 3 people have already applied for rights to slap “stable genius” all over apparel. Problem is … only one can own the rights to put it on clothes.
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Congress raises concerns over Florida drilling exemption
The Trump administration may have violated federal law by exempting Florida from a national plan to expand offshore drilling, a Democratic senator charged Thursday.
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‘Give 3 good reasons for slavery:’ 4th-grade homework assignment sparks backlash, apology in Wauwatosa
 A homework assignment asked fourth-graders at a private school in Wauwatosa to argue why slavery was a good thing. It prompted an apology from the principal of Our Redeemer Lutheran School, who said the question wasn’t supposed to have an answer because there are no good reasons for slavery.
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Entire class punished for ‘microaggressive’ comments
A Columbia University professor recently described how an entire class was punished after some students used “microaggressive” language in an online chat.
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San Diego State College Republicans out professors they say indoctrinate students
One professor gave her students a white privilege quiz. Another declared classrooms as tools for “civil resistance.” A third called John McCain a “war criminal.”
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Veterans behind bars: US jails set aside special cellblocks
The military veterans playing cards in the Albany County jail wear the same orange uniforms as everyone else, with “INMATE” printed down the legs. But their service offers one distinct privilege: a special cellblock where they can work through problems they often share, such as substance use and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Senior Pentagon Soldier to ISIS: Surrender or Get Beaten with a Shovel
In a blunt warning to the remaining ISIS fighters, Army Command Sgt. Maj. John Wayne Troxell said the shrinking band of militants could either surrender to the U.S. military or face death.
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VA Hospitals Could Be Left Vulnerable to Violence: Watchdog Report
The Department of Veterans Affairs isn’t following certain security standards at its hospitals and clinics that are required of all federal buildings, potentially putting patients and visitors at risk, the Government Accountability Office concluded in a report released Thursday.
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Saturday Show 10-15-16

Festival of Sukkot
The Festival of Sukkot begins on Tishri 15, the fifth day after Yom Kippur. It is quite a drastic transition, from one of the most solemn holidays in our year to one of the most joyous.
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House Chairmen Demand AG Explain Lack of Prosecution in Gold King Mine Case
Three House Republican committee chairmen are demanding that Attorney General Loretta Lynch explain why the Department of Justice (DOJ) ignored a referral by the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) and declined to prosecute those involved in the Gold King Mine disaster despite “evidence of criminal wrongdoing by the EPA”.
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Israel rejects UNESCO redefinition of history
Israel has rejected a move by UNESCO, the international “cultural” organization tied to the United Nations, to redefine history and remove Jewish links to the Temple Mount, the likely site of the original Jewish temples during biblical times.
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Silicon Valley’s acute homeless problem is on the ballot
The images are startling: Homeless men, women and children huddled on the streets of the San Francisco Bay Area — often in the shadows of start-ups and high-tech behemoths generating billions of dollars in wealth.
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Pope denounces Christians who don’t want refugees as “hypocrites”
People who call themselves Christians but do not want refugees at their door are hypocrites, Pope Francis said Thursday, amid reports of new tragedies involving migrants crossing the Mediterranean.
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Navy cruise missile strike destroys radar sites in Yemen
A U.S. Navy ship launched cruise missiles and destroyed three radar sites from a rebel-controlled area in Yemen, the service announced late Wednesday. The announcement came a day after a Navy ship was apparently targeted for a second time by missiles originating from the area.
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Military Spokesman: ISIS Now Putting IEDs on Drones
ISIS previously has used commerical, off-the-shelf drones for surveillance and to deliver ordnance, and now it is is using drones to deliver explosives, Colonel John Dorrian, the spokesman for U.S. military operations in Iraq, told reporters on Wednesday.
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 3 men charged in Garden City bomb plot
Garden City Police and community members held a meeting Saturday to discuss how the community plans to move forward a day after three men were arrested for planning a domestic terrorist attack.
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What Percentage of Your Truck Is Made in America?
For seven years, Cars.com has been collecting data from various sources to determine which vehicles are the “most American” — meaning which ones have the highest percentage of its parts content produced in the U.S. and Canada.
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Asgardia space nation accepting citizenship applications
Leaders of the Asgardia project discussed the prospective space nation at a news conference in Paris Wednesday (Oct. 12). The leaders aim to launch Asgardia’s first satellite in 2017 and say they would like to eventually have a space station where some, but not all, of its planned 150 million (mostly Earth-dwelling) nationals would live and work.
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Show Notes 10-07-2016

Friday Show 10-7-16

Exclusive: Dozens of Afghan troops AWOL from military training in U.S.
The Afghan army has occasionally been infiltrated by Taliban militants who have carried out attacks on Afghan and U.S. troops, but such incidents have become less frequent due to tougher security measures.
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ISIS hunts for cats in Mosul after council issues fatwa
Al Sumaria News stated, “The so-called Islamic State’s Central Fatwa Committee issued a fatwa (Islamic legal decree) prohibiting the breeding of cats inside houses in Mosul.”
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The Montana Common Core Standards
The Montana Board of Public Education’s adoption of the Montana Common Core Standards (MCCS) was independent, voluntary and not required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) or any other federally-funded program.
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Russia launches massive nuclear war training exercise with ’40 million people
The Russian government has launched a nationwide civil defence training exercise to ensure the country is properly prepared in the event of a nuclear, chemical and biological attack from the West.
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Russia’s Lavrov Hopes Those Pushing for U.S. Military Strikes in Syria Won’t Prevail
Amid deepening U.S.-Russia tensions over the crisis in Syria, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Thursday that Moscow hopes those in Washington pushing for attacks against the Assad regime will not prevail.
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Feds: Because of Climate Change ‘We Will Have to Say Goodbye’ to Lady Liberty
The Department of Interior’s blog stated Thursday that the biggest threat to seven of the most iconic landmarks in the United States is climate change.
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EPA launches Arc X one stop climate change adaptation website
The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday launched a new website, the Adaption Resource Center or ARC-X, to help leaders of “the nation’s 40,000 communities with information and tools to increase resilience to climate change.”
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Show Notes 07-26-2016

Tuesday Show 7-26-16

Ryan Gives Grieving Mothers the Cold Shoulder
A small group of bereaved mothers went all the way to Speaker Paul Ryan’s doorstep over the weekend to demand answers — but were given only a cold shoulder.
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Obama Thinks All is Well with Crime, Immigration
President Obama expressed his resentment for the attacks leveled at his leadership during last week’s Republican National Convention by insisting the levels of crime and illegal immigration are at their lowest levels in the past few decades.
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Mexican border agency seen as aiding illegal immigration
South of the border, Grupo Beta is seen as a humanitarian organization that steers north-bound migrants through the crossfire of warring drug cartels. But in Texas, many view it as part of a pipeline that sends humans and drugs pouring into the U.S., all with the funding and backing of the Mexican government.
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Government to BAN etc and e.g. – for the sake of non-English speakers
Roger Wemyss Brooks of the Latin Mass Society of England and Wales, which teaches Latin language courses, said: “Latin is part of our cultural heritage and it’s part of the basis of English.
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ISIS claims they shot down US military jet over Iraq
Amaq, a news agency that supports the terrorist organisation claimed ISIS shot down a plane flying near Ain Al-Asad air base in Anbar.
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U.S. Hits Record 129 Months Since Last Major Hurricane Strike
No major hurricane has made landfall in the continental United States for a record-breaking 129 months, according to data going back to 1851 compiled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
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7- Eleven Delivers Slurpees By Drone
The convenience store 7- Eleven conducted the first-ever commercial delivery to a customer’s home by drone, flying Slurpees, candy, donuts, hot coffee, and a chicken sandwich to a customer’s backyard in Reno, Nevada last week.
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As UN pushes radical Sustainable Development Goals, scientists are trying to make sense of them
Less than a year after the United Nations embraced the all-encompassing, socialist-oriented agenda known as the Sustainable Development Goals, scientists are just beginning to try to figure out what the new goals may entail, how they can even be measured, and where the high-flown objectives contradict or impede themselves.
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Show Notes 07-24-2016

Sunday Show 7-24-16

AAA Rescued Record 32 Million Drivers in 2015; Blames New Technology for Breakdowns
Despite technological advances in newer vehicles, the American Automobile Association (AAA) rescued a record 32 million drivers nationwide in 2015, including 900,000 in the Washington, D.C. area alone, AAA announced Wednesday.
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Safe GOP convention boosts Cleveland’s image to the world
Cleveland’s safe and successful turn as host of the Republican National Convention has helped establish it as an ideal location for large events but also a city that people will consider when deciding where to live and do business, Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson said Friday.
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Kerry: Air conditioners as big a threat as ISIS
Secretary of State John Kerry said in Vienna on Friday that air conditioners and refrigerators are as big of a threat to life as the threat of terrorism posed by groups like the Islamic State.
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Hundreds honor teen suffering from fatal disease at prom themed party
More than 1,000 people converged on a Wisconsin town Friday to honor a 14-year-old girl with a fatal illness who has chosen end-of-life hospice care over surgery.
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ASEAN split on how to deal with China in South China Sea row
Southeast Asia’s main grouping opened a meeting of their foreign ministers Sunday, deeply divided on how to deal with China’s territorial expansion in the South China Sea that has impacted some of its members and whipped up an increasing diplomatic quagmire.
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Obama administration mun as Turkey’s post coup crackdown expands
The Obama administration’s relative silence on Turkey’s alarming crackdown following last week’s failed coup attempt is tantamount to a green light for President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to continue his assault on democracy in the NATO nation, experts said.
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Virginia high court strikes down Governors order giving felons right to vote
Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s action restoring the voting rights of more than 200,000 felons was unconstitutional, Virginia’s highest court ruled Friday, siding with Republican lawmakers who said the governor overstepped his authority.
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Dems open convention without Wasserman Schultz
Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she is stepping down as chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee at the end of the party’s convention, which is set to begin here Monday.
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REP. BRAT TO CONGRESS: TIME TO FIGHT FOR AMERICA
Despite a Republican convention featuring public rules fights and Donald Trump being stiff-armed by his closest rival to the nomination, one of the leading conservative insurgents in Congress believes the party is unifying around core principles and could get a lot of good done for the American people if GOP congressional leaders would just do it.
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Show Notes 07-17-2016

Sunday Show 7-17-16

Washington state restaurant apologizes for asking cops not to eat there
Lucky’s Teriyaki is apologizing and is offering free meals to law enforcement officers after word spread that the restaurant in Washington state didn’t want law enforcement to dine there.
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Elderly Couple Facing Eviction After Grandson Allegedly Scams Them Out of Their Home
This elderly couple never imagined the day they would face eviction from their California home, or that such an ordeal would allegedly be the work of their beloved grandson.
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Pokémon players shot at in Palm Coast, Fla.
Pokémon Go has led to muggings, car crashes, cliff rescues — and now a shooting.
A 19-year-old man and his 16-year-old friend were sitting in a car on Primrose Lane playing Pokémon Go around 1:30 a.m., when a man walked out of his house nearby and fired shots at the car, according to a news release from the Flagler County Sheriff’s Office.
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State AGs, Green Groups Subpoenaed Over ‘Coordinated’ Attack on Climate Change Skeptics
The state attorneys general of New York and Massachusetts and eight environmental groups that have accused climate change skeptics of lying to the public are now themselves the subject of a congressional probe.
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U.S. air operations halted at Turkey air base
Political instability in Turkey, a NATO member and critical U.S. partner in the fight against terrorism, is already threatening to have an impact on the U.S.-led campaign against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
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Beware the Soros zombies
Billionaire George Soros has funded liberal organizations intent on bringing confusion, disarray and trouble to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week. And they’ve already had some victories.
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Show Notes 06-30-2016

Thursday Show 6-30-16

Russian harassment of US diplomats reportedly includes break-ins, dog-killing
Russian President Vladimir Putin’s security agencies allegedly have ramped up their intimidation of American diplomats across Europe in ways that would be illegal in the United States: harassment, breaking and entering, and in at least one case, killing a man’s dog.
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One-armed ISIS commander eyed as mastermind of Istanbul massacre
The mastermind of Tuesday’s Istanbul airport massacre appears to be a one-armed Chechen terrorist who trained Russian-speaking militants, had a long history of supporting terror and was known as “Akhmed One-Arm,” according to several government documents and regional media reports.
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Dems: Clinton never personally denied Benghazi security
Democrats on the House Benghazi panel said in a report that security at the Libya facility the night of Sept. 11, 2012 was “woefully inadequate,” but former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton never personally denied any requests from diplomats for additional protection.
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Bozell: Rep. Gowdy’s Job Was ‘To Get To The Truth’ About Benghazi — ‘He Punted’
In reaction to the report released today by the House Select Committee on Benghazi, which was investigating the Sept. 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. compound in Benghazi, Libya, where four Americans were murdered, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell said it was the committee chairman’s job “to get to the truth, and he punted.”
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Poll explores whether Americans know enough to pass citizenship test
Sure, you can fire up a barbecue and set off fireworks. But as the Fourth of July weekend approaches, do you know enough about the United States to become a citizen?
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Forced diversity training backfires claims Harvard study
Diversity might be a good thing, but forced training in tolerance not only fails in the business world, it backfires, according to a new Harvard study.
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Mowing the lawn can be injurious to youngsters, report finds
Getting children to mow the lawn is a common way to teach them responsibility. But a new study found that more than 9,000 youngsters are injured in the U.S. every year while mowing the lawn.
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Illinois Police Officers Sue Their Dept. Over ‘Always On’ Body Cams
Police officers in Illinois have sued the Village of Round Lake Park in federal court after discovering that their body cameras were always on and recording them in private situations, such as when they were changing clothes or using the restroom.
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