Show Notes 07-22-2017

Saturday Show 7-22-17

Tea Party wins 8-year battle with IRS
It took eight years of frustration, court battles and waiting. It took the complete change of a presidential administration. And it took the persistent fighting of a top-level team of lawyers.
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Wells Fargo to shut down 450 branches
Wells Fargo has long been known among analysts and commentators as one of the nation’s most efficient banks. As a result, when its efficiency started to slip recently, the bank responded by announcing an initiative to cut annual expenses by $2 billion by the end of 2019.
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Shock News: US Post Office Broke the Hatch Act to Help the Clinton Campaign
Yesterday the Washington Post posted a story about a senate hearing that revealed that during the 2016 presidential campaign the USPS broke law by giving time off for postal workers to campaign for Clinton, but if you watched the mainstream media news you would never know about it.
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Budget boss Mulvaney claims Obama had ‘secret list’ of proposed regulations
At a news briefing this week, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney continued to push the Trump administration’s goal of cutting back on Obama-era regulations.
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Shock News: US Post Office Broke the Hatch Act to Help the Clinton Campaign
It seems that the democrats sunk every egg they had into the Hillary Clinton basket in 2016, and now the party and its leadership are irrevocably doomed.
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VA has fired 500 employees since Trump took office, report shows
The Department of Veterans Affairs has fired more than 500 employees since Jan. 20, when President Trump took office, according to a list of job categories of employees recently disciplined or fired.
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Why US may slash military aid to an ally it helped build up in Lebanon
From the imposing ramparts of a newly constructed military base, fortified by rock-filled blast barriers and an armor-plated watchtower, Lebanese soldiers keep a careful eye on the adjacent border area with Syria, which until not long ago was home to Syrian rebel groups and extremist militants.
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Ohio veteran can keep ducks to relieve PTSD, depression
An Ohio veteran who sought to defy local law and keep pet ducks, that he says help relieve his post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, can now keep them.
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NRA, eschewing talk of guns, ratchets up rhetoric
Buoyed by soaring gun sales and a White House supportive of its efforts, the National Rifle Association has charted a new course in its messaging, employing the group’s sophisticated communications apparatus to attack liberal politicians and activist groups, as well as mainstream news outlets, without ever mentioning guns, rifles, or the Second Amendment.
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TV Station Credits Cows, NOT Armed Citizens for Capturing Armed Carjacker
WUSA, a CBS affiliate station in Washington, D.C., cunningly credited a herd of brave bovine for helping deputies catch a suspected armed carjacker in Berryville, VA.
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The day Communion was served on the Moon
“One small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind,” stated Astronaut Neil Armstrong, July 20, 1969, as he became the first man to walk on the moon. The second man on the moon was Colonel Buzz Aldrin.
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Saturday Show 11-5-16

Election Chaos Fears Have Preppers Stockpiling Survival Food
While sales for “long term food” typically see an increase around natural disasters and elections, “this is more intense than what we saw in 2012,” said Keith Bansemer, VP of marketing for My Patriot Supply, a manufacturer and seller of survival food. During the previous election his company saw sales double. This time it’s triple.
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Priests don’t have to report sexual abuse, Louisiana Supreme Court rules
A priest has no duty to report confidential information heard during a sacramental confession, the Louisiana Supreme Court ruled Friday in a bid to clear up what it called the “widespread confusion” caused by its decision two years ago in a long-running case involving the Roman Catholic Diocese of Baton Rouge.
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Delaware County tosses most late voter forms from grassroots group
Election officials in suburban Philadelphia rejected about three-quarters of the thousands of last-minute voter registration applications gathered by a grassroots organization under state police investigation for possible fraud, saying most were error-ridden.
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Feds plan to force vaccinations
A public-interest legal team has filed comments with the federal government objecting to a planned Centers for Disease Control rule-change that would allow the government to impose forced vaccinations on Americans under certain circumstances.
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Health officals find first cases of new superbug in US
Just five months after federal health officials asked hospitals and physicians to be on the lookout for an often-fatal, antibiotic-resistant fungus called Candida Auras, 13 cases have been reported, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday.
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SHOTS FIRED IN SEA CONFLICT BETWEEN CHINA, SOUTH KOREA
For months, China has been expanding its claims to waters and islands off its shores, leading to conflict with neighbors and even the U.S., which has dispatched warships to the region to defy the rapidly growing military power in Asia.
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Poughkeepsie refugee resettlement office to open; officials seek answers
The Church World Service Network expects to settle 80 refugees in the City of Poughkeepsie in the next fiscal year. Area officials, however, including City Mayor Rob Rolison, do not have details on how the settlements will work, and the Dutchess County Executive’s Office says it did not have a hand in approving the plan.
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Islamic State calls for attacks on Election Day voters
The Islamic State is calling for the “slaughter” of U.S. voters on Election Day and demanding Muslims not participate in the democratic process, according to a U.S.-based terrorist monitoring group.
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Which states want to drop daylight saving time?
Of Benjamin Franklin’s brainchildren, daylight saving time is probably the least beloved. The Founding Father was one of the first proponents of setting back and turning forward one’s clocks, advocating the notion in a 1784 essay, though it wasn’t adopted in the United States for well over another century.
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Show Notes 12-31-15

Thursday show 12-31-15

History of New Year Day
The earliest recorded festivities in honor of a new year’s arrival date back some 4,000 years to ancient Babylon. For the Babylonians, the first new moon following the vernal equinox—the day in late March with an equal amount of sunlight and darkness—heralded the start of a new year.
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Churches offer refuge for Central Americans facing U.S. deportation
Leaders of the church-based Sanctuary Movement vowed last Friday to offer their places of worship as refuge for immigrants facing deportation under an Obama administration crackdown on Central American families who entered the United States illegally.
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Only 2 States Say Guard Could House Immigrant Children
Only two states say their National Guard operations could provide facilities to house unaccompanied immigrant children following a request for options from the government.
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Mexican marijuana farmers see profits tumble as U.S. loosens laws
“People don’t want to abandon their illicit crops, but more and more they are realizing that it is no longer good business,” said Juan Guerra, the state’s agriculture secretary.
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Pastor takes Christians to task for owning guns
Rob Schenck, a pastor who chairs the Evangelical Church Alliance, sent a strong message about gun control to fellow Christians, telling them in no uncertain terms in a Washington Post opinion piece those who profess a belief in Jesus should not own firearms.
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Ex-Atheist spends Christmas feeding Christian refugees
His mother was once America’s most famous atheist. He grew up a Marxist and an unbeliever, a product of his dysfunctional family. But as an adult, William J. Murray, son of Madalyn Murray O’Hair, found God, and today the former atheist spends his Christmases helping feed Christian refugee children in the Middle East.
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Catholic Bishops chide Congress for not including conscience protection
The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is chiding Congress for its failure to include the Abortion Non-Discrimination Act (ANDA) in its $1.1 trillion omnibus funding bill, which was signed by President Obama on December 18.
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Outgoing Philadelphia mayor: Deep poverty holding city back
Mayor Michael Nutter says he believes he is leaving at the top of his game. But even with the notable successes, he said Philadelphia’s deep-seated poverty is stopping the city from reaching its potential.
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Show Notes 12-03-15

Thursday show 12-3-15

PENTAGON CHIEF TO MILITARY: OPEN ALL COMBAT JOBS TO WOMEN
After three years of study and debate, Defense Secretary Ash Carter ordered the military Thursday to open all military jobs to women, removing the final barriers that kept women from serving in combat, including the most dangerous and grueling commando posts.
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Pentagon to Cut Pay Rates for Autism Specialists: Tricare Officials say
Providers of applied behavior analysis therapy are currently reimbursed at a fixed rate based on education and certification level, regardless of location. Providers with a doctorate or master’s degree are paid an hourly rate of $125, those with a bachelor’s degree, $75; and technicians, $50.
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Air Force burning through bomb stockpiles striking ISIL
The Air Force has fired more than 20,000 missiles and bombs in the air war against the Islamic State, depleting its stocks of munitions and prompting the service to scour depots around the world for more weapons and to find money to buy them, according to records obtained by USA TODAY.
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2 female suicide bombers kill at least 6 in northern Cameroon
The governor of Cameroon’s Far North province says that two teen female suicide bombers detonated explosives in a town in the area killing at least six people.
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White House Rejects Plan to Close Gitmo Prison as Being Too Expensive
White Hose rejects plan to close GitThe U.S. government rejected a plan by the Department of Defense to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba for being too expensive and sent it back to the Pentagon for revision, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.
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Inside secret underground ISIS bomb-making lair found littered with US-made guns and drugs
The underground tunnels, used by ISIS militants to hide from bomb raids, were discovered under Sinjar, which has only recently liberated from ISIS control.
Read Morehttp://www.express.co.uk/news/world/622070/underground-ISIS-lair-US-made-guns-and-drugs-Raqqa-bomb-campaign

Nuns pose as prostitutes to rescue victims of human sex trafficking
A network of nuns has ditched their habits to dress like prostitutes and infiltrate brothels worldwide in an effort to rescue victims of sex trafficking and buy children sold into slavery.
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New York paper mocks GOP for praying
The New York Daily News couldn’t be blunter in its characterization of those in the Republican Party who turned to prayer after the San Bernardino shooting, rather than gun control, blasting out a headline that basically read: relying on God was stupid.
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Term mass shooting confuses public and masks phenomenon
Depending on how you’re counting, the shooting deaths of 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif. Wednesday was the 22nd mass shooting this year, or one of more than 300 in a near-daily epidemic.
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/12/03/term-mass-shooting-confuses-public-and-masks-phenomenon/76717870/

University: Your holiday party cannot be a Christmas party in disguise
The taxpayer-funded university’s Office for Diversity and Inclusion recently released an “unofficial” edict calling for the campus to host holiday parties that do not emphasize religion or culture.
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ICE Director: ‘Bunch’ of Countries Refuse U.S. Efforts to Deport Criminal Aliens
Sarah Saldana, the director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, told Congress on Wednesday that ICE cannot deport criminal aliens without the cooperation of their home countries — and there’s “a whole bunch” of countries that do not cooperate in taking back their criminals.
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Entire police department resigns over flap with Mayor
One community in South Carolina has been left police-free after the entire force resigned over disputes, in part, about First Amendment rights with the newly elected mayor, Patty Carson.
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Show Notes 11-29-15

Sunday show 11-29-15

Advent
The word Advent is from the Latin adventus for “coming” and is associated with the four weeks of preparation for Christmas.
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Obama’s Thanksgiving surprise: 144 big regulations
President Obama is nothing if not predictable. Required by law to release plans for new regulations twice a year, the administration has consistently done so just before major holidays, when few are paying attention.
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MAINE DOUBLES DOWN ON WELFARE REFORM
Mayhew claims that detractors – who mostly take issue with welfare reforms enacted by Gov. Paul LePage, a Republican, since his election in 2011 – have gone so far as to call her “Commissioner Evil,” and her and LePage’s policies a “War on the Poor.”
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Dad arrested for protesting graphic sex book loses case
A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by a parent who contended he was wrongfully arrested at a school board meeting where he was protesting a class assignment given to his ninth-grade daughter to read a book containing graphic descriptions of “rough sex” between teens.
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Wisconsin school nixes reading book about transgender kid
A southern Wisconsin elementary school canceled a planned reading of a children’s book about a transgender girl after a group threatened to sue.
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A bloody Thanksgiving in the Pacific
As we celebrate Thanksgiving, take a moment to remember the many Americans who gave their last full measure 72 years ago in the attack on the Tarawa Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.
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Ranchland owners speak out on death tolls
In CHANNEL 5 NEWS Special Report: “Paying the Price,” we reported how a Honduran woman went missing on private ranch land in Brooks County. Human rights activist Eddie Canales said the woman is one of hundreds who die in the brush.
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China to set up 1st overseas naval base in Djibouti next to US airbase
Beijing plans to set up a naval facility in Djibouti, East Africa, to boost counter-piracy and peacekeeping efforts, officials say. The future Chinese installation will be near a US airbase reportedly used for the Pentagon’s drone operations.
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China again tests nuclear hypersonic missile
China carried out a sixth flight test of its new high-speed nuclear attack vehicle on Monday designed to defeat U.S. missile defenses or carry out global strikes.
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Show Notes 10-25-15

Sunday show 10-25-15

$240,000 Awarded in Religious Discrimination Suit
A federal court awarded $240,000 to two former drivers, Somalian-American Muslims whose religious beliefs were violated by an Illinois trucking company. According to the Peoria Journal Star, Morton, Ill.-based Star Transport Inc. was sued in 2013 by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
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New video purportedly shows US-Kurdish raid against ISIS
The Kurdish regional government in northern Iraq released a video Sunday purportedly showing the joint raid of a prison by U.S. and Kurdish peshmerga forces in which they released 70 hostages held by the Islamic State group.
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Somebody Is Carving Select Cuts from Canadian Cows and Leaving Their Corpses in the Field
Ranchers in British Columbia are complaining that someone is going around shooting their cows and carving out select cuts, leaving the bulk of the corpses behind.
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Virgin bride presents ‘certificate of purity’ to dad at wedding
A newlywed bride is defending her choice to present her dad with a “certificate of purity” that allegedly proves she remained a virgin until her wedding day. Brelyn Bowman married Timothy Bowman on Saturday, Oct. 10.
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Bacon to be listed alonside cigarettes; abestos as carcinogens
To the gastronomic horror of many, The Daily Mail reported this week that the WHO is set to list beef, bacon and sausage alongside cigarettes and asbestos as cancer causing agents.
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Freedom Caucus lies in wait for Paul Ryan
A staunch conservative member of Congress says the House Freedom Caucus may have its heart in the right place, but its tactics are counterproductive and actually aid the political opposition.
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New York man builds own country in Utah
A New York man is building his own sovereign nation called Zaqistan on a remote piece of land in Utah. Zaq Landsberg has created a yellow-and-red flag, official-looking passports and a border patrol gate guarded by a giant robot sentry for the realm, KSL-TV reported.
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Vatican synod calls for a more welcoming Catholic Church
Pope Francis on Sunday appeared to lecture church elders at the closing of a landmark summit on the family here, suggesting they should not be quick to exclude a broad array of people deserving of God’s grace.
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Judge dismisses Wikipedia lawsuit over Freedom Caucus  surveillance program
A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit Friday filed by the publisher of Wikipedia over allegations that the National Security Agency was spying on its users, ruling that the plaintiffs did not have enough information to plausibly make their claim.
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Study: 69% of Patients on Antidepressants Are Not Clinically Depressed
Sixty-nine percent, or more than two-thirds of patients currently using the most commonly prescribed antidepressant medications, “never met the criteria for major depressive disorder,” according to a recent study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.
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Wayne State University programs offers chance at free medical education
Wayne State University plans to pay for the medical education of 10 students each year as part of an effort to help more students from low-income backgrounds become doctors.
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A Pope Who Explained the Blessings of Private Property

In 1818, when only 8 years old, Gioacchino Pecci began his studies with the Jesuits at a school in Italy. Seventy-three years later, as Pope Leo XIII, he published Rerum Novarum, an encyclical letter simultaneously defending the rights of working people and private property.

As this pope saw it, they were inseparable.

“It is surely undeniable that, when a man engages in remunerative labor, the impelling reason and motive for his work is to obtain property, and thereafter to hold it as his own,” he wrote.

“If one man hires out to another his strength or his skill, he does so for the purpose of receiving in return what is necessary for the satisfaction of his needs; he therefore expressly intends to acquire a right full and real, not only to the remuneration, but also to the disposal of that remuneration, just as he pleases,” he said.

“Thus, if he lives sparingly, saves money, and, for greater security, invests his savings in land, the land, in such case, is only his wages in another form,” said this pope, “and, consequently, a working man’s little estate thus purchased should be as completely at his full disposal as are the wages he receives for his labor.”

So what was the first great threat this pope saw to the thrifty working man and his hard-earned property? Socialists.

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